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ReadyGo's conformance to AICC, SCORM, ADA, 508, and W3C
  1. AICC, SCORM, and IMS (XML) training standards
    1. ReadyGo has adopted and implemented the AICC, SCORM, and IMS (XML) training standards
    2. Take a free online course to learn more on AICC, SCORM, IMS (XML) and other e-learning standards.
    3. Take a tour see how easy it is to enable SCORM for tracking in a ReadyGo WCB course. The tour only takes one minute! (requires Flash).
ReadyGo software provides the highest levels of accessibility by conforming to recommendation in and beyond ADA/508 and W3C-accessibility guidelines. The tables below identify the different attributes that are needed to adhere to the standards along with ReadyGo's status in each of these areas.
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  1. Web Content Accessibility Guidelines
    1. This checklist describes ReadyGo conformance to the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0.
    2. The table is originally from the Checklist of Checkpoints for Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0, copyright 1999 W3C (MIT, INRIA, Keio), All Rights Reserved. W3C Document Notice and License. Information on ReadyGo has been added to the table.
    3. Recommendations in this table help ensure that sites (including those built with ReadyGo-built software) are accessible to people with disabilities.
  2. Priorities
    1. Each checkpoint has a priority level assigned by the WC3 Working Group based on its impact on accessibility.
      1. Priority 1 - A Web content developer must satisfy this checkpoint. Otherwise, one or more groups will find it impossible to access information in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint is a basic requirement for some groups to be able to use Web documents.
      1. Priority 2 - A Web content developer should satisfy this checkpoint. Otherwise, one or more groups will find it difficult to access information in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint will remove significant barriers to accessing Web documents.
      1. Priority 3 - A Web content developer may address this checkpoint. Otherwise, one or more groups will find it somewhat difficult to access information in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint will improve access to Web documents.
  1. Priority 1 checkpoints
    1. In General (Priority 1) Yes No N/A
      1.1 Provide a text equivalent for every non-text element (e.g., via "alt", "longdesc", or in element content). This includes: images, graphical representations of text (including symbols), image map regions, animations (e.g., animated GIFs), applets and programmatic objects, ascii art, frames, scripts, images used as list bullets, spacers, graphical buttons, sounds (played with or without user interaction), stand-alone audio files, audio tracks of video, and video. Yes - author should use the ALT fields provided in tool for both graphics and audio files (don't forget about the hearing-impaired).    
      2.1 Ensure that all information conveyed with color is also available without color, for example from context or markup. Courses do not use color to convey information/navigation. Hyperlinks appear underlined.    
      4.1 Clearly identify changes in the natural language of a document's text and any text equivalents (e.g., captions). Author must ensure that if they change language, they include tags indicating so.    
      6.1 Organize documents so they may be read without style sheets. For example, when an HTML document is rendered without associated style sheets, it must still be possible to read the document. Yes, content is output sequentially so that style sheet positioning is not necessary.    
      6.2 Ensure that equivalents for dynamic content are updated when the dynamic content changes. The only dynamic content is in self-graded test answers. Use Server-Side Testing to guarantee conformance. Blind readers such as Jaws (2007) are now able to read dynamic HTML quite well, so this requirement can be loosened.    
      7.1 Until user agents allow users to control flickering, avoid causing the screen to flicker. No flicker built into WCB courses    
      14.1 Use the clearest and simplest language appropriate for a site's content. Author's responsibility    
      And if you use images and image maps (Priority 1) Yes No N/A
      1.2 Provide redundant text links for each active region of a server-side image map.     Server-side image maps are not inherently used
      9.1 Provide client-side image maps instead of server-side image maps except where the regions cannot be defined with an available geometric shape. Yes - only image map is for Quiz answer cover. Quiz answer is provided as text controlled by style sheet. Answer is also provided as ALT/Title attribute for quiz cover graphic.    
      And if you use tables (Priority 1) Yes No N/A
      5.1 For data tables, identify row and column headers. Yes    
      5.2 For data tables that have two or more logical levels of row or column headers, use markup to associate data cells and header cells.     Not used
      And if you use frames (Priority 1) Yes No N/A
      12.1 Title each frame to facilitate frame identification and navigation. A no-frames version of the course is always available through the main.htm start page. Alternatively, a template that uses a "frameless" layout can be used. With the frameless layouts, the content for the sidebar and the services bar is after the page content but the style sheet can visually place it above. This means that sighted users will see the navigation tools early in the content, but blind readers will get to it unobtrusively after other content on the page.    
      And if you use applets and scripts (Priority 1) Yes No N/A
      6.3 Ensure that pages are usable when scripts, applets, or other programmatic objects are turned off or not supported. If this is not possible, provide equivalent information on an alternative accessible page. Author's choice - we suggest use of the ALT tags    
      And if you use multimedia (Priority 1) Yes No N/A
      1.3 Until user agents can automatically read aloud the text equivalent of a visual track, provide an auditory description of the important information of the visual track of a multimedia presentation. Yes - use audio alongside the graphics and the ALT tags.    
      1.4 For any time-based multimedia presentation (e.g., a movie or animation), synchronize equivalent alternatives (e.g., captions or auditory descriptions of the visual track) with the presentation. Author's responsibility    
      And if all else fails (Priority 1) Yes No N/A
      11.4 If, after best efforts, you cannot create an accessible page, provide a link to an alternative page that uses W3C technologies, is accessible, has equivalent information (or functionality), and is updated as often as the inaccessible (original) page.      X
  1. Priority 2 checkpoints


    1. In General (Priority 2) Yes No N/A
      2.2 Ensure that foreground and background color combinations provide sufficient contrast when viewed by someone having color deficits or when viewed on a black and white screen. [Priority 2 for images, Priority 3 for text]. Yes    
      3.1 When an appropriate markup language exists, use markup rather than images to convey information. Author's choice    
      3.2 Create documents that validate to published formal grammars. Author's choice    
      3.3 Use style sheets to control layout and presentation. Yes  
      3.4 Use relative rather than absolute units in markup language attribute values and style sheet property values. Yes    
      3.5 Use header elements to convey document structure and use them according to specification. Yes    
      3.6 Mark up lists and list items properly. Yes    
      3.7 Mark up quotations. Do not use quotation markup for formatting effects such as indentation. Indentation done using style sheet tags.  
      6.5 Ensure that dynamic content is accessible or provide an alternative presentation or page. Yes    
      7.2 Until user agents allow users to control blinking, avoid causing content to blink (i.e., change presentation at a regular rate, such as turning on and off). Yes    
      7.4 Until user agents provide the ability to stop the refresh, do not create periodically auto-refreshing pages. Yes    
      7.5 Until user agents provide the ability to stop auto-redirect, do not use markup to redirect pages automatically. Instead, configure the server to perform redirects. Yes    
      10.1 Until user agents allow users to turn off spawned windows, do not cause pop-ups or other windows to appear and do not change the current window without informing the user. By using the no-frames version, the glossary pop-up can be avoided. No other pop-ups occur.    
      11.1 Use W3C technologies when they are available and appropriate for a task and use the latest versions when supported. Yes - ReadyGo WCB will update technologies as they become widely supported.    
      11.2 Avoid deprecated features of W3C technologies. Doing so as much as possible.    
      12.3 Divide large blocks of information into more manageable groups where natural and appropriate. Yes- WCB encourages authors to put large chunks of data into "Tell-me-more" and other pages.    
      13.1 Clearly identify the target of each link. Yes - Net Links    
      13.2 Provide metadata to add semantic information to pages and sites. Available    
      13.3 Provide information about the general layout of a site (e.g., a site map or table of contents). Yes, available in multiple places (optional instruction set for navigation instructions, Course-map).    
      13.4 Use navigation mechanisms in a consistent manner. Yes, WCB now also includes single-key navigation    
      And if you use tables (Priority 2) Yes No N/A
      5.3 Do not use tables for layout unless the table makes sense when lingerie Otherwise, if the table does not make sense, provide an alternative equivalent (which may be a linearly displayed version) Yes    
      5.4 If a table is used for layout, do not use any structural markup for the purpose of visual formatting. Yes    
      And if you use frames (Priority 2) Yes No N/A
      12.2 Describe the purpose of frames and how frames relate to each other if it is not obvious by frame titles alone. Yes  
      And if you use forms (Priority 2) Yes No N/A
      10.2 Until user agents support explicit associations between labels and form controls, for all form controls with implicitly associated labels, ensure that the label is properly positioned. Yes    
      12.4 Associate labels explicitly with their controls. Yes    
      And if you use applets and scripts (Priority 2) Yes No N/A
      6.4 For scripts and applets, ensure that event handlers are input device-independent. Yes    
      7.3 Until user agents allow users to freeze moving content, avoid movement in pages. Yes, currently no movement inserted in pages    
      8.1 Make programmatic elements such as scripts and applets directly accessible or compatible with assistive technologies [Priority 1 if functionality is important and not presented elsewhere, otherwise Priority 2.] Yes, using simple JavaScript    
      9.2 Ensure that any element that has its own interface can be operated in a device-independent manner. Yes, no use of different interfaces    
      9.3 For scripts, specify logical event handlers rather than device-dependent event handlers. Yes    
Control keys for blind readers
The following keys can be used to navigate a course
n/N = next page
p/P = previous page
h = home (start page)
m = course map
a = play Audio
b, c, d, e, f, ...,l = sub-page
NetLinks: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5... based on the order of the net links
Q = Quiz
S = Step by Step
T = Test
M = TellMe More
Y = Try This


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